Fix Network Connection Issues in Windows 10

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Fix Network Connection Issues in Windows 10 with this easy steps when you get problems connected to a network or internet in Windows PC/Laptop.

1. Use Network Troubleshooter

Press Windows key + I > Network & Internet > Status > Network troubleshooter.Note: if that doesn’t work and you’re using a wired connection, please make sure both ends of your Ethernet cable are securely plugged in to your Windows/PC and your router or modem.

2. Make sure Wi-Fi ON

  • Select the Start button > Settings > Network & Internet > Wi‑Fi to check. Next, select Show available networks, and if a network you expect to see appears in the list, select it > Connect.
  • Make sure the physical Wi‑Fi switch on your laptop is turned on. (An indicator light usually shows when it’s on.)
  • Select the Start button > Settings > Network & Internet > Airplane mode and turn off airplane mode if it’s on.
  • Move closer to the router or access point.

3. Restart your wireless router/modem

  • Unplug the power cable for the router/modem from the power source.
    Some modems have a backup battery. So if you unplug the modem and lights stay on, remove the battery from the modem.
  • Wait at least 30 seconds or so.
    If you had to remove the battery from the modem, put it back in.
  • Plug the modem back into the power source. The lights on the modem will blink. Wait for them to stop blinking.
  • Plug your router back into the power source.
    Wait a few minutes for the modem and router to fully power on. You can usually tell when they’re ready by looking at the status lights on the two devices.
  • On your PC, try to connect again.

4. Check Internet Service Provider (ISP)

  • Press Windows key + R then type ipconfig > OK.
  • Look for the IP address listed next to Default gateway. Write down that address if you need to. For example: 192.168.1.1
  • At the prompt, type ping <DefaultGateway> then press Enter. For example, type ping 192.168.1.1 and press Enter. The result should be something like this:
    Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=64Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=64

    Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=64

    Reply from 192.168.1.1: bytes=32 time=5ms TTL=64

    Note: Ping statistics for 192.168.1.1: Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss), Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds: Minimum = 4ms, Maximum = 5ms, Average = 4ms

5. Run networking commands in command prompt

  • Search Command prompt, press and hold (or right-click) Command prompt, and then select Run as administrator > Yes.
  • Run the following commands in the listed order then check to see if that fixes your connection problem:
    • Type netsh winsock reset and press Enter.
    • Type netsh int ip reset and press Enter.
    • Type ipconfig /release and press Enter.
    • Type ipconfig /renew and press Enter.
    • Type ipconfig /flushdns and press Enter.

6. Update Network Adapter Driver

  • Search Device Manager, and then select Device Manager from the list of results.
  • Select Network adapters > the network adapter name.
  • Press and hold (or right-click) the network adapter, and then select Update driver > Search automatically for updated driver software. Follow the steps, then select Close.
  • After installing the updated driver, select the Start button > Power  > Restart if you’re asked to restart.

7. Uninstall Network Adapter Driver and Restart

If the previous steps can’t Fix Network Connection Issues in Windows 10, try to uninstall the network adapter driver, and then restart your computer. So Windows automatically install the latest driver.

Note: Before uninstalling, make sure you have drivers available as a backup. Visit the PC manufacturer’s website and download the latest network adapter driver from there. If your PC can’t connect to the Internet, you’ll need to download a driver on a different PC and save it to a USB flash drive so you can install the driver on your PC. You’ll need to know the PC manufacturer and model name or number.

  1. Search Device Manager, and then select Device Manager from the list of results.
  2. In Device Manager, select Network adapters > the network adapter name.
  3. Press and hold (or right-click) the network adapter, and then select Uninstall device > Delete the driver software for this device check box > Uninstall.
  4. After uninstalling the driver, select the Start button > Power  > Restart.

    Note: After your PC restarts, Windows will automatically look for and install the network adapter driver. If Windows doesn’t automatically install a driver, try to install the backup driver you saved before uninstalling.

8. Use Network Reset to Reinstall Network Devices

Using network reset be the last step you try. This can help solve connection problems you might have after upgrading from a previous version of Windows to Windows 10, as well as fix problems where you can connect to the Internet but not to shared network drives. It removes any network adapters you have installed and the settings for them. After your PC restarts, any network adapters are reinstalled, and the settings for them are set to the defaults.

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